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By Wellpets Vets, Aug 10 2017 07:44AM

Barry the Springer Spaniel puppy has been with us now for 2 weeks and he has settled in really well, we cracked the crate training over the first week, although the first few nights were very hard.




After reading various books and opinions from different sources we tried setting our alarm to get him up in the night. This allowed him go to the toilet, rather than waiting until he was wide awake and being vocal which then would take him longer to settle. This worked very well however by 5am he still thinks it time for us all to be up and playing!


His toilet training in the first week was impeccable, we were so impressed with him, giving him lots of praise when he toileted outside and introducing the “be busy” cue, come week 2 though he has started to lapse a bit and had a few accidents in the house. Puppies do not have full bladder control until over 6 months of age, which we have to keep reminding ourselves after the fourth wee puddle we have cleaned up!





We have been taking Barry out and about as much as we can (carrying him until he is fully vaccinated). He has met a variety of people and a few other fully vaccinated dogs as well as Woody the horse! He has socialised with other puppies at training class and is doing great with his basic training, so far, he has learnt his name, sit, lie down, give his paw, just about roll over and high five, his recall is improving and we are just starting this week on his loose lead walking!




Keeping him mentally stimulated is just as important as physical exercise, we have “banished the bowl” and are using lots of activity feeders to provide his meals, such as kongs, snuffle mat, licky mat, scrunched up paper with kibble hidden in, cardboard boxes with shredded paper and sprinkling food in, slow feeder bowls, scatter feeding in the garden. Lots to keep his little brain working hard to earn his food. Give one a try for your pet - we have a range that can be ordered at the practice (extra 10% off for Pet Health Club Members - ask a member of staff).





We as puppy parents are facing the same everyday issues that a lot of owners who come to the surgery do – play biting being a huge one for us over the last week. We are trying various techniques to reduce this, it is a work in progress so will update in the next blog!



There are the endless hours of fun he provides, from discovering a new toy, or when he does the cute head turn when he hears a new noise on the TV, the boundless energy he has at 5am in the morning and last thing at night as he has his final dash around the garden, as his tail wags frantically when a new person approaches to say hello!


You can catch Barry at our next Wellpets event which is at the RSPCA dog show on Sunday 13th August 11-3pm, where he will be helping out on the Wellpets stand, so if you have any questions about our Pet Health Club, as Barry is a member can fill you in on all the benefits!









By Wellpets Vets, Aug 10 2017 07:44AM

Barry the Springer Spaniel puppy has been with us now for 2 weeks and he has settled in really well, we cracked the crate training over the first week, although the first few nights were very hard.




After reading various books and opinions from different sources we tried setting our alarm to get him up in the night. This allowed him go to the toilet, rather than waiting until he was wide awake and being vocal which then would take him longer to settle. This worked very well however by 5am he still thinks it time for us all to be up and playing!


His toilet training in the first week was impeccable, we were so impressed with him, giving him lots of praise when he toileted outside and introducing the “be busy” cue, come week 2 though he has started to lapse a bit and had a few accidents in the house. Puppies do not have full bladder control until over 6 months of age, which we have to keep reminding ourselves after the fourth wee puddle we have cleaned up!





We have been taking Barry out and about as much as we can (carrying him until he is fully vaccinated). He has met a variety of people and a few other fully vaccinated dogs as well as Woody the horse! He has socialised with other puppies at training class and is doing great with his basic training, so far, he has learnt his name, sit, lie down, give his paw, just about roll over and high five, his recall is improving and we are just starting this week on his loose lead walking!




Keeping him mentally stimulated is just as important as physical exercise, we have “banished the bowl” and are using lots of activity feeders to provide his meals, such as kongs, snuffle mat, licky mat, scrunched up paper with kibble hidden in, cardboard boxes with shredded paper and sprinkling food in, slow feeder bowls, scatter feeding in the garden. Lots to keep his little brain working hard to earn his food. Give one a try for your pet - we have a range that can be ordered at the practice (extra 10% off for Pet Health Club Members - ask a member of staff).





We as puppy parents are facing the same everyday issues that a lot of owners who come to the surgery do – play biting being a huge one for us over the last week. We are trying various techniques to reduce this, it is a work in progress so will update in the next blog!



There are the endless hours of fun he provides, from discovering a new toy, or when he does the cute head turn when he hears a new noise on the TV, the boundless energy he has at 5am in the morning and last thing at night as he has his final dash around the garden, as his tail wags frantically when a new person approaches to say hello!


You can catch Barry at our next Wellpets event which is at the RSPCA dog show on Sunday 13th August 11-3pm, where he will be helping out on the Wellpets stand, so if you have any questions about our Pet Health Club, as Barry is a member can fill you in on all the benefits!









By Wellpets Vets, Jul 21 2017 10:56AM

Lucy from our Worle branch, and her partner Robert will be welcoming a new springer spaniel puppy called Barry into their home this weekend. After a lot of research on the breed and with Robert having previous experience with Springers, they got to looking for a suitable puppy for them. After getting in touch with a lovely family that had a 3-year-old bitch that had a litter of six pups and emailing back and forth asking the relevant questions an appointment was made to view the litter in their home environment with the bitch.


“We wanted a puppy that had been reared in a home environment with the hustle and bustle of daily life. Socialisation and habituation starts with the mother and the breeder. The more sounds, smells, animals and people they can have positive experiences with from birth the better well rounded the puppies will be as adult dogs.”


After meeting the family and the puppies they chose a male puppy and have named him Barry. A good breeder will ask you lots of questions, be honest and open with you about how the puppies have developed, what food they are being weaned on to, what parasite treatment they have received, dam and sire health information (more breed health information can be found here http://www.thekennelclub.org.uk/services/public/breed/). A contract had been drawn up with the owner and signed by both parties. It is always advisable to have a written contract - a fantastic example of a puppy contract can be found here https://puppycontract.rspca.org.uk/home


Barry will stay in his current owner until he is 8 weeks old, by which time Barry will have been checked by a vet, received his first vaccination, microchip, flea and worm treatment. In the meantime, in the last 2 weeks since meeting Barry, Lucy and Robert have been busying preparing for his arrival. Making sure they have;


- a crate to create a safe area for him to sleep in


- toys for playing, bowls and activity feeders,


- lead, collar, tags with his identification (as per the law),


- blankets


- researching into which puppy food to feed him, creating a plan for a daily routine for him


- looking at puppy socialisation and training classes in their local area and reading a lot around this area.






By Wellpets Vets, Jul 14 2017 09:51AM

‘Dry eye’, or a lack of tears, is more common that you realise, affecting up to 1 in every 22 dogs. A reduction in tear production, and therefore of natural eye lubrication, is a painful condition; left untreated it can lead to permanent eye damage. The good news is his month Wellpets has launched a major campaign to combat this problem; focusing on early detection and early treatment before lasting injury occurs.


Keratoconjunctivitis sicca or ‘Dry Eye’ is caused by the dog’s own immune system destroying the small glands that manufacture tears. Damaged and scarred glands mean less tears so less lubrication each time the eye blinks. Left untreated, the gland is eventually destroyed and the animal may lose the ability to produce tears altogether. This condition is very painful and may lead to permanent blindness. Although it can occur in any dog, certain breeds of dogs are particularly susceptible to Dry Eye: English Cocker Spaniels, West Highland White Terriers, Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Shih Tzu’s, Bulldogs, Pekinese, Pugs and Lhasa Apso dogs.


Signs can be variable; from a dog with slightly ‘dull’ eyes, to inflamed eyes which doesn’t seem to respond to standard treatments, to more severe symptoms of thick discharge and even corneal ulceration. Signs can be very subtle early on, but this is precisely the best time to diagnose the condition: before permanent damage occurs.


Fortunately, there’s a simple and highly accurate test for dry eye, and this month Wellpets is offering the test FREE at our Clevedon, Worle and Weston-super-Mare branches. The test only takes a minute and most dogs aren’t particularly bothered by the procedure. The test can be part of an existing consultation (say during a vaccination) or as a stand-alone if you have one of the breeds of dog mentioned above at extra risk, or if you’re just worried about your dog’s eyes.


BOOK TODAY!


By Wellpets Vets, Jul 14 2017 09:50AM

Archie arrived at Wellpets as an emergency after being hit by a car. He was immediately assessed and triaged by Laura the vet and our nursing team. Archie was in shock with a very high heart rate and pale gums. He was able to walk around but was moving stiffly and his nerve reflexes were slower than normal.




He received oxygen therapy and intravenous fluids and was monitored intensively by the team. Once Archie was more stable x-rays were taken to determine if there was any internal damage. Unfortunately x-rays revealed that Archie had a small fracture on the first lumbar vertebrae of his spine.



Archie was referred to Langford’s specialist Neurology department for a CT scan, which confirmed the fracture and he later had surgery to repair his spine.



Archie is now at home and recovering remarkably well. He visited us this week for his post op check to have his stitches removed.


What a STAR!!!


ARCHIE - BRAVE PET OF THE MONTH!







By Wellpets Vets, Jun 30 2017 08:17AM

Almost two thirds of humans in the UK weight more than they should, and it’s no surprise we’re passing on the same modern day problem to our pets: recent reports suggest up to half of all dogs and almost as many cats in the UK are overweight.


Just as with humans, obesity is a big problem. Not only does it shorten lives, it makes them less enjoyable. Being overweight can increase the chance of developing unpleasant and often painful disorders such as arthritis, diabetes mellitus, cardiorespiratory, urinary and reproductive diseases, and cancer. Studies have also shown that dogs and cat who have lost weight tend to be more active and enjoy themselves more; having better quality of lives purely by being happier.


And why do our pets get fat? There are three main reasons: they aren’t getting enough exercise, are eating more food than they need, and eating ‘extra’ calories in the form of treats and human food or leftovers. The last cause is a very important and often overlooked factor. For instance, did you know if you gave your 10kg dog a single biscuit, you’d need to eat an entire hamburger to consume the same number of calories relative to your body size? If you poured your cat a cup of milk, then you’d have to eat three hamburgers!

Obesity in cats and dogs is a real problem, but you and your pet aren’t alone: you have Wellpets to help! All it takes is an appointment at a Weight Clinic to get started. You can get advice, information and even diet food if necessary to make our pet leaner, more active and healthy again.






By Wellpets Vets, Jun 30 2017 08:08AM

Summer’s here, and along with the longer days and sunshine that we enjoy so much, there’s also a new danger to our pets: hyperthermia (overheating). And it doesn’t have to be a hot day; even warm ones can cause heat stress in our pets. That’s because with our hairless bodies and lots of sweat glands - human adaptations to a hot climate - a warm day to you or I might actually be a scorcher to your panting pet. Apart from finding a cooler place, the only way your dog, cat or rabbit can lose extra heat is by panting, which is a far less efficient system than the human ability to sweat all over.


Rabbits and dogs, particularly dogs with squashed faces like Bulldogs or Pugs, are especially at risk, although ultimately any animal can be overwhelmed by hyperthermia. Heat stress can develop in only a matter of minutes and can be fatal! Signs of heat stress can include: excessive panting, open mouth breathing, red gums, drooling, vomiting, a lack of energy and trouble walking.

Some tips for keeping your pets cool in summer are:


Dogs:


Providing wet, cool towels for your pet to lie on and cool down as needed.

Create your own ice blocks either by freezing water bottles and placing them into your dog’s water bowl to keep it cool.


Paddling or shell pools for our water loving pets: just add a large rock or fill with some sand to ensure it cannot tip over.


Create your own shade: tarps, shade cloths and camping shelters are an easy way to create instant shade.


Install a doggy door and give your pet access to inside the cool house

Try to walk and exercise your pet early in the morning or in the evening when it’s cooler.




Cats:


Provide plenty of cool water: ceramic bowls (rather than metal ones) will stay cooler for longer.


For indoor cats ensure there is plenty of ventilation and cool air flow in the house.


Cooling mats and beds to lie on are a great way for our feline friends to cool down.



Pocket pets:


Frozen water bottles in an old sock are a great way for our pocket pets to lay along or on and cool down

Freeze some of their favourite food for a refreshing treat.


Shade, shade, shade! Ensure they have plenty of shade and are out of direct sunlight.


When it’s 25 C+ always bring them indoor.


Wildlife:


Lastly, don’t forget about wildlife! Install a bird bath, water feature or even a bucket full of water. But don’t forget to add a large rock to ensure they are able to get out of the water if they accidently fall in!




By Wellpets Vets, May 22 2017 07:10AM


Veterinary nurses have to don many caps including, anaesthetist, surgical assistant, laboratory technician, radiographer, nutritionist, teacher, care giver, midwife, a friendly face, counsellor, paw holder, cleaner, receptionist, advice giver, dental assistant, paramedic, comforter, animal restrainer, listener ….. The list goes on and on!!



There are also many different career paths open to veterinary nurses from working in general practice as our nurses do, to specialist referral, equine and exotic nurses. Some nurses will branch out into different roles such as pet insurance advisor, nutritional advisor, sales of pet food or pharmaceutical products, lecturing and assessing student nurses. There are options to work for charity organisations such as the RSPCA, PDSA, Dogs Trust, and expand into zoo or wildlife nursing.


For more information please visit:


http://www.rcvs.org.uk/education/i-want-to-be-a-veterinary-nurse/

http://www.bvna.org.uk/a-career-in-veterinary-nursing/a-career-in-veterinary-nursing


This year in support of Veterinary Nursing Awareness Month Wellpets are holding a fundraising event to raise money for The Cinnamon Trust, on Wednesday 31st May, 9:30am – 1:30pm at Worle.

There will be cakes and books for sale, a raffle for some great prizes, and some volunteers with their Cinnamon Trust foster dogs available to meet and learn more about the charity’s work and how you can become a volunteer dog walker or fosterer. Our nurses Lucy and Naomi will also be available to show you around the Worle practice and discuss any questions you may have about veterinary nursing, from training to a typical day as a Wellpets Registered Veterinary Nurse, and what is involved.



Our chosen charity is to raise funds for is The Cinnamon Trust, as they are the only national charity for the elderly, terminally ill and their pets. The trust was founded in 1985 by Mrs Averil Jarvis, and named after her own Corgi Cinnamon who passed away at the age of 17 just as the trust was getting started.

Pets as we know provide companionship and have a positive effect on our lives, The Cinnamon Trust recognises this and their primary aim is to preserve this relation between pet and owner. They have a national network of over 15,000 volunteers that are able to provide practical day to day help such as walking a dog for a housebound owner. They also co-ordinate foster care for when owners have a spell in hospital or long term care for pets who’s owners have died or moved into residential accommodation.


We would love to see as many of you from the local community on the day as possible, so please come along to support us and help raise some money for a deserving charity.







By Wellpets Vets, May 10 2017 10:53AM

Wellpets offer free flea and tick checks for cats and dogs, plus expert advice on preventative treatments to suit your pet’s individual needs



The number and variety of parasites effecting pets in the UK has changed substantially over recent years. Thanks to modern day living with central heating, flea pupae can survive dormant in carpets, soft furnishing and between floorboards, without the pet, for up to 1 year. Lungworm has spread across the country to regions that it previously not been seen in and a recent report found ticks affected 1 in 3 dogs.


Call us to book your free flea and tick check at your local Wellpets branch, where you will also get preventative treatment options and advice tailored to your pet’s specific needs.


To do this we take into account the local areas parasite make up, as well as your pet’s lifestyle to be able to best advise on the most suitable products. For example, does your dog swim regularly? Is your cat an indoor only cat? Do your pets hunt or scavenge? The answers to these and other questions will help us to determine the most suitable parasite preventative care plan to keep your pet, family and home free from parasites and the diseases they carry.




By Wellpets Vets, May 9 2017 11:32AM

Toby, the gorgeous 7 year old Miniature Poodle came into see vet Laura last month as he had a large lump on his sternum (breastbone) which was growing.


The decision was made to remove the lump. Surgery commenced and the lump was successfully removed. A surgical drain was placed to help prevent a build-up of fluid around the surgical site.

Toby recovered well, but because the lump was in a tricky area, at Toby’s post-operative check-up we noticed that the wound had started to breakdown.


We saw Toby on a regular basis for bandage changes and to assess his wound. To help with the healing process the wound was cleaned and flushed, and medical grade manuka honey was applied. It wasn’t long before we started to see a huge improvement and Toby’s wound eventually healed.


Toby has been a fantastic patient and it is our pleasure to award him ‘PET OF THE MONTH’ for April.




Worle Yeovil Yetminster Weston Super Mare
Clevedon

Wellpets West Country